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Η ΕΚΡΗΞΗ ΠΟΥ ΑΛΛΑΞΕ ΤΟΝ ΚΟΣΜΟ Print

 

Santorini Volcano Eruption       64_c-fig-3_1950

197 BC Volcano Eruption.
19 AD Volcano Eruption.
46 AD Volcano Eruption.
726 AD Volcano Eruption.
1570 Volcano Eruption.
1650 AD Volcano Eruption (26Sept-6Dec)
1707 AD Volcano Eruption(23May-17Jan 1708)
1866-1870 AD Volcano Eruption.
1925 AD Volcano Eruption (11Aug-1926 21May).
1928 AD Eruption of the volcano (23Jan-17Mar)
1939July-1941Aug AD Volcano Eruption.
1950 AD Volcano Eruption(10Jan-2Feb)

The volcano of Santorini is one of the most significant volcanoes in the world history because it is considered responsible for the destruction of the Minoan Crete Santorini is probably the most extraordinary island in the Aegean Sea. It is actually a Caldera (crater), an ancient rim of a still active volcano. The beautiful white houses are scattered along the cliffside. The modern city is actually only the eastern crescent of the ancient circular island. After the explosion of 1628 the crust of volcanic ash that formed over the hollow center of the island caved in and water filled the Caldera, resulting today’s harbor.Until some two million years ago the island was very silent (remains of the non-volcanic soil can still be found in the SE part of the present island). But the underwater volcanoes started producing magma and gradually created small islands. Continuous activity created mountains which united with the non-volcanic island to make one big island

There are historic evidences about a cataclysmic eruption early in the Late Bronze Age (1645 BC) which, scientist say, led to the destruction of the Minoan civilization on Crete. However, the facts show that the Minoan civilization (the burning of the Minoan palaces, in fact) fall 200 years after the eruption (in 1450 BC). The same theory led to excavations at Akrotiri, which turned out to be a prehistoric Aegean version of Pompeii and Herculaneum (berried by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 A.D). After the cataclysmic eruption there was a period of 1300 years while the volcano remained silent. But in 198 BC a volcanic eruption created an island, Hierra. In 46 AD another eruption created another island, called Theia. Finally, in 60 AD a third eruption united the two islands. The newly united islands “grew” after the eruption of 726 AD. Two more eruptions (in 1457 and 1508 AD) increased the size of the island. It’s now called Palea (Old) Kameni and its peak reaches 110 m above sea level. Sixty five years after Palea Kameni reached its present form, another eruption broke out at 2400 m NE of the island’s center and a small island was formed. It was then called Mikra (Small) Kameni. In 1707, activity began again, this time near the small island when two cones appeared. They were called Aspronisi and Macronesi. Those were united in the course of the following five years by an island which formed between Palea and Mikra Kameni, much larger and higher then either and was called Nea (New) Kameni. It is the youngest island in Greece.

But this is not the only volcano in Santorini.

There are other eruptive centers: Akrotiri volcanoes, Thera volcanoes, Skaros volcano, post-caldera Kamari volcanoes, Megalo Vouno volcanoes, Mikro Profitis Ilias volcano and Therasia volcanoes. The largest volcanic eruptions on Santorini date to: 197 BC, 1866, 1925 and 1949-1950,

Santorini-Island of the VolcanoSantorini is one of the 5 volcanic centers making up the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Jutting out from the deep blue sea, the sheer volcanic cliffs are topped with gleaming white houses and churches, resembling snowcapped mountains. Layer upon layer of red volcanic rock form a visual demonstration found nowhere else on earth. NEA KAMENI : 21ST CENTURYThe Minoan Volcanic Eruption : Bronze Age 1600 BCThe group of islands known as Santorini is unique. Probably the only volcano with a caldera that reaches into the sea, the last major explosion occurred during the Minoan Bronze Age 3,600 years ago. The thunderous fury of nature left its mark on the island, the home of Greece's last active volcano which still smolders today. The entire center of the circular island sank into the sea during the tremendous volcanic explosion. The eruption caused tidal waves which virtually wiped out the advanced Minoan Civilization of Crete, 70 miles to the south. The huge mass of pumice thrown out from the Minoan eruption covered the surface of the sea over a wide region and was washed up at higher levels on the shores by the tsunamis triggered by earthquakes. A recent example is the earthquake in Santorini that happened on 9th July 1956, when the tides on the island of Ios reached a height of 25 meters. On most of theThe group of islands known as Santorini is unique. Probably the only volcano with a caldera that reaches into the sea, the last major explosion occurred during the Minoan Bronze Age 3,600 years ago. The thunderous fury of nature left its mark on the island, the home of Greece's last active volcano which still smolders today. The entire center of the circular island sank into the sea during the tremendous volcanic explosion. The eruption caused tidal waves which virtually wiped out the advanced Minoan Civilization of Crete, 70 miles to the south.

The huge mass of pumice thrown out from the Minoan eruption covered the surface of the sea over a wide region and was washed up at higher levels on the shores by the tsunamis triggered by earthquakes. A recent example is the earthquake in Santorini that happened on 9th July 1956, when the tides on the island of Ios reached a height of 25 meters. On most of the shores of the surrounding part of the Aegean, lumps of pumice have been found that clearly drifted on the surface of the water. Pumice was also found on the northern coast of Crete and on the shores of Anafi, Limnos, Paros, Samothraki, Cyprus and even Israel. Experts have discovered traces of this eruption as far as Egypt on the Nile Delta.   64_dscn557164_hist_photo6_0164_nea_kameni

Last Updated ( Monday, 12 April 2010 )